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700 hp C7 Corvette Stingray ZR1 may be in the works!



The C7 Chevy Corvette - the Stingray - was revealed last month and the details are very promising (full post: The Stingray is back! Details about the new 2014 C7 Corvette). If we're to learn anything from the changes from C5 to the C6 Corvette, the C7 base and Grand Sport Corvettes will approach the performance of the current Z06. Carbon fibre bits and an all aluminum frame are now standard across all models. As a result the new car is 99 lbs lighter but the chassis 57% stiffer than the outgoing model. With the added help of 50/50 weight distribution and increased power, GM says the base model Stingray will be quicker than the current Grand Sport Corvette. That means the Z06 will have to move up a lot in performance and so will the ZR1.

The next ZR1 is expect to use a supercharged version of the new LT-1 V8 in the new base Corvette, much like the current Corvette ZR1 formula, with about 700 hp. The Z06 may keep its massive naturally aspirated 7.0 litre V8 but with more power. Fuel economy probably will not drop with the increase power. GM will make sure that the Z06 and ZR1 are differentiated enough in terms of hp. As a result, the ZR1 will maintain its hp advantage. The Z06 should pack around 580-600 hp and the ZR1 should be close to or even crack 700 hp.

According to GM, the new LT-1 V8 is expected to make at least 450 hp in the base Corvette. Before the Camaro ZL1 numbers were released, it was expected to have around 550 hp which means that "at least 450 hp" should translate to a power rating of 460-480 hp. The Z06 and ZR1 are expected to be released about a year after the base model to let the base model establishes itself and get sales. Much like the development of the C6 Corvette, the Z06 will probably be released first, followed by the ZR1. 

Source: Motor Trend


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